The adoption of these industry data standards has considerable benefits for both the supplier and customers of in-flight gasoline, in particular: different guidelines should be taken into account in order to promote the development of SAF from both a supply and demand perspective. The table below contains publicly available information on sustainable fuel consumption agreements. But even if ways to manufacture SAFs could be developed at an acceptable cost and integrated on a large scale into the fuel supply of aircraft, at best, they would likely reduce the impact of flight on the climate, but not eliminate it. Given that energy-rich liquid fuels will continue to power most commercial aircraft operations at least for the next century, there is a need to develop new ways of producing these fuels in ways that reduce (and ultimately zero, if not net) negative greenhouse gas emissions. By showing that innovation for a more efficient use of energy and resources in building planning can both benefit its customers and feed dividends (or at least not their end result), airlines and airports that implement these operations and technologies are paving the way for others to learn and adopt best practices, and offer market stimulation, which is necessary to increase the production of new equipment and fuels – and thus the cost of learning and economies of scale. While aircraft and engine manufacturers have seen impressive increases in fuel efficiency over the past half century, most of them have been incremental, with a few exceptions. Once a functional design has proven its worth, engine and structural improvements evolve from generation to generation. You can send all questions to the Data Standards Group for fdsg@iata.org. Data standards for the entire refuelling cycle, from tendering to invoicing, have been developed with airlines and industrial partners through the Fuel Data Standards Group. These standards allow for a paperless refueling cycle. The standards are available for free download below. A number of ways already exist to support the use of sustainable aviation fuels, ensuring certainty of future demand needed to stimulate investment in production capacity.

FAS are eligible under CORSIA to directly reduce emissions in the sector. Robust GHG modelling was performed and certification requirements for FAS were incorporated into the system. This modelling and regulatory framework can be used and possibly even improved through national policy frameworks to promote FAS. Their activity consists of the purchase or leasing of assets with a very long life: aircraft operate on average for at least 30 years. Airlines then operate and maintain these aircraft and incur fuel costs ranging from 20% to 40% depending on the length of the flight. While this favours operational and technical measures to reduce fuel consumption, efficiency-related measures must be weighed against emissions of safety, noise and local pollutants. . .

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