Bilateral trade negotiations between the two countries began in November 2010, with the IA-CEPA announced in a joint statement chaired by Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono and Prime Minister Julia Gillard. [4] [5] Following several conferences and meetings during 2011, following a meeting in Darwin on 3 July 2012, another joint communiqué calling for the opening of negotiations on the agreement before the end of this year was issued. [6] Subsequently, however, relations between the two countries deteriorated (due to the 2013 Australian spying scandal and the Indonesian execution of Australian citizens in 2015) and, in 2015, Indonesia introduced tariffs on Australian cattle imports. Finally, in March 2016, Indonesian Trade Minister Thomas Lembong and his Australian counterpart Steven Ciobo announced a resumption of negotiations. [7] Four rounds of negotiations had taken place before the resumption of talks. [8] IA-CEPA builds on the benefits of the agreement establishing the ASEAN-Australia-New Zealand Free Trade Area (AANZFTA), which will continue to operate alongside IA-CEPA. Importers and exporters have the opportunity to choose the agreement that suits them best. Australia has a great chance of developing its trade, investment and economic cooperation relations with Indonesia. Six rounds of negotiations took place between the two countries until February 2017 and Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and Indonesian President Joko Widodo (Jokowi) both pledged to end the talks by the end of the year, in March 2017. [9] The continuation of negotiations during the year did not lead to the conclusion of the agreement before the end of 2017, which covered a total of ten rounds until November. [8] In March 2018, Indonesian Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi acknowledged that negotiators were still trying to resolve some issues and extended the deadline to the end of 2018. [10] Indonesian Trade Minister Enggartiasto Lukita also attempted to sign the agreement in April until November 2018.

[11] The Australian Trade and Investment Commission (Austrade) is the Australian government authority that helps Australian companies attract overseas transactions in their products and services by reducing the time, cost and risk associated with the selection, entry and development of international markets. The Indonesia-Australia Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (IA-CEPA) sets the framework for a new era of closer economic cooperation between Australia and Indonesia and opens up new markets and opportunities for businesses, primary producers, service providers and investors. IA-CEPA is a comprehensive agreement that builds on existing multilateral and regional agreements, including the ASEAN-Australia-New Zealand Free Trade Agreement (AANZFTA). IA-CEPA entered into force on 5 July 2020. . . .